Apr 6, 2022How are The Culture Stewards shaking up brewery culture?

As part of our Expert Outlook 2022 series, we asked industry experts for their insights into the key behaviours shaping their sector over the coming year, then created key mindsets that embody these behaviours. So as spring approaches, how are The Culture Stewards shaping brewing practices in the UK?

Author
J’Nae PhillipsJ’Nae Phillips is a Junior Editor at Canvas8. With a background in fashion, she’s experienced in understanding how trends influence culture and play a part in shaping our human behaviour. When not working or studying for her journalism postgrad, she can be found writing for her style focused newsletter and is an avid reader.

Since pubs reopened in April 2021, cask beer sales are down by 76 million pints. As craft culture and an ale revamp changes people's drinking behaviours, artisanal drinks and authentic storytelling is playing a key role in winning over The Culture Stewards who are reframing community, culture, and craft against the backdrop of globalisation.

We spoke to Melissa Cole, an award-winning writer and broadcaster and one of the UK's leading beer and food experts, about her thoughts on these developments:

What was the biggest change for beer in 2021?
A lot of small producers have started contracting and they're looking to harness the local market. Urban wineries, like Renegade, are seeing the value of having on-site contact with their consumers. The alcohol market is contracting and the first generation of craft drinkers are now moving into middle age, having families, or stepping up their careers. As such, people are thinking more holistically about their lifestyle.

What should we look out for from The Culture Steward in 2022?
There’s a rising interest in brewing your own drinks. The home brew market is huge and boasts a very scientific community. However, I think we’re going to see some waning demand for the technology as there are lots of people who would choose not to buy beer from certain companies because they don’t like their practices or the practices of their parent company.


Brand in action:
Guinness
has launched a regenerative farming scheme working alongside both Irish farmers and suppliers to reduce the carbon emissions of barley production. The collaborative approach is building a better understanding around regenerative processes and adapting them to fit in with local practices and customs.

Stay on top of the latest insights with Keeping TABS, our free newsletter
Want our free newsletter, previews of report releases and event invites?
Yes please